How’d You Get Into EMS?

Like most of the best things in my life, I came into EMS completely unintentionally.

Prior to EMS, I had a particular fondness for swimming. At 17, I was preparing to start my 10th season of competitive swimming, and my fourth season of 10-&-under coaching, when I got a phone call from my head coach. Enrollment was down for the upcoming season, and it looked like I won’t be coaching the little kids after all.

Well. That greatly opened up my summer schedule.

To most people, that would hardly be a bad thing. But I had spent my adolescence as one of those annoying over-achievers that burnt the candle at both ends. In high school, I spent my afternoons, evenings, and weekends darting around to my 13 extra-curricular activities. If I had down time, I was in a panic, trying to remember what project, assignment, meeting, practice, rehearsal, game, meet, or activity I was supposed to be doing. I couldn’t relax during my “time off.” It actually made me more anxious.

So I began my job hunt. Unfortunately, it seemed that every attempt to find a local job ended in “Thanks, but no thanks.” Each small store already had their seasonal adolescent workers hired. Not giving up yet, I figured if I couldn’t get paid to do work, well, maybe I could volunteer. Seeing how I was starting college in the fall for my biology/pre-med degree, I decided I’d give the hospital a call and see how I could volunteer there.

“Sorry,” I was told. My heart started to sink. “We only take volunteers in the ER if they’re EMT students.”

EMT student, huh? That sounds kind of fun. I could learn more about healthcare, get some practice actually treating patients, and ride around in an ambulance. There’s no harm in at least seeing what it’s about, right? And if it’ll be a gateway to get me to work at the hospital–even better!

I set up a meeting with a fire department officer later that week. He had a paramedic take me to do a truck check on one of the ambulances. I sat on the bench seat, and listened intently to his explanation of the equipment, what EMT’s can do, and the EMS culture. I was awestruck.

By the end of that hour, I was so completely in love with EMS. I don’t know what did it, but sitting in that truck just felt right. I didn’t want to leave.

It didn’t matter how much I had to learn. It didn’t matter how long it would take. It didn’t matter that I had no idea how I was going to deal with things like guts, gore, and death. I would figure all of it out in time. For the first time in my life, I knew I could do something. I mean, just knew it. On the days I had my doubts, there was always this determined little whisper in the back of my mind that said that I could get through this.

That night, I researched EMS blogs, almost desperate to find someone’s story or opinion that would take this dreamy glow off of my newest and strongest aspiration. As it turns out, it only deepened my love for the field. The next day, I was enrolled in a local First Responder class, and began my EMS apprenticeship at the fire department.

And the rest, as they say, is history.

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