Healing Is Not A Linear Process

I’ve learned plenty of things as an EMT. I’ve learned what the top and bottom numbers of a blood pressure mean. I’ve learned how to splint a fractured bone. I’ve learned the proper way to talk on the radio. I’ve learned how to start an intravenous line. I’ve learned that real life is nothing like the textbook. In the textbook, you see calm, cooperative patients, neatly packaged in controlled, well-lit environments. Ask anyone who’s ever run an EMS call, and they’ll tell you the real world is nothing like that. But, there’s a quieter, more subtle difference between the textbook and reality; one that might not be realized right away. Once you experience it, however, you’ll never forget it.

You see, there are no pictures in the textbooks of EMT’s lost in thought, laying wide awake at night. There are no images of paramedics waking up with nightmares. There are no illustrations of providers crying, or torturing themselves with “Why?” and “What if?” These things are mentioned, though. But in real life, you only hear about it quiet whispers, if at all.

I’m willing to bet that most EMT’s and paramedics who truly love their work, and have some time under their belt, have had at least one call that stays with them. It could be a nasty trauma. It could be a medical call that got out of your control. It could be subtle details in an otherwise routine call that trigger something else. We don’t talk about it too much, though. Maybe we’re afraid, or we think we’re alone. Maybe we’re embarrassed. Maybe talking about it just isn’t helpful for some.

Everyone deals with their demons differently. Go do whatever you need to do to help yourself. Talk about it. Meditate. Write. Lift some weights. Paint. Run until you can’t feel your legs anymore. Shoot some targets. Spend time with loved ones. Play with your dog. Do whatever it is you need to so you can help yourself.

But, what if you’ve done that? What if you’ve done everything you can think of?

This is the other thing I’ve learned in EMS: healing is not a linear process. There are good days, and there are bad. You reach your peaks, and you think everything is fine…and the next day, you wake up to find yourself in a trough again. It doesn’t mean you are broken. All of your work is not undone when you find yourself hurting again. The ups and downs of your progress aren’t as important as the direction: forward. You may be down today, but you are further forward than you were yesterday. A straight line may be the quickest way to get from “unwell” to “well.” But there’s a reason why it’s called the “healing process” and not the “healing race.” There will be days where you will soar, and there will be days that you will falter.

Trust me when I say that you will have good days. You will have calls that make you smile, fill you with pride, and lift you up. These troubles that bother you so much now, will one day serve to strengthen and teach you; not haunt you. We all have those calls that we will never forget, but I promise you, they will not always cause this kind of pain that worries you right now.

 

Comments

  1. probietopractitioner says:

    To one friend in particular (and you know who you are)…Trust the Yankee. You are doing fine. 😉

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