I Took The Red Pill

I went through a box of old pictures today, and took that trip down memory lane to happier and simpler times. There was one of my second grade friends and I sitting on a brick wall in the park, sticking out Kool-Aid technicolor tongues. Another featuring my eight-year-old sister and I, horrifically sunburnt, carefully sculpting our sand castle–no, impenetrable sand fortess–on a July day at the beach. Fast forward several years, and there I am at 15 with a sports medal around my neck, a boyfriend’s arm around my waist; laughing at something I can’t remember. Towards the bottom of the box, there’s one of  me squinting into the camera, with a 6-year-old toothy grin pushing dimples onto my freckled cheeks.

I know I’m looking back at myself in these pictures, yet I feel like an entirely different person. And I can’t help but wonder…Would these girls in these pictures still feel like such strangers to me if I had made other choices? Would they feel more like memories, and less like different lives? Would they be proud to see the young woman they would go on to become? The young woman that became an EMT?

Maybe, if I hadn’t been an EMT, I never would have left the sports I’d loved. Instead of fighting my way through a community college nursing program, maybe I would be a college athlete now at some university. Perhaps, I’d be majoring in English, pursuing my life-long dream of becoming a writer.

On my breaks, maybe I’d come home and work at the grocery store, or a diner. I’d watch the clock as I worked, counting down the hours until I could go spend the evening with my friends. Instead of having friendships consisting mostly of adults, all of my companions would be stressed, idealistic kids my own age. Instead of trying to find the words to say when hearing about divorces, children, and financial issues; my friends and I would groan about our papers due next week. We’d excitedly share the news of that internship we worked so hard for. We’d look forward to graduating, gazing through dreamy veils at the perceived freedoms of adulthood.

Maybe, if I hadn’t been an EMT, I’d meet some great guy. Instead of constantly apologozing for and juggling my hectic schedule, maybe I’d actually have time to spend getting to know him. Maybe I’d have days to go out and evenings to stay in.  Maybe I’d have someone to say, “I love you” to before I hung up the phone. Instead of hearing, “I can’t do this anymore. We’re done,” maybe I’d hear “I love you” back.

Maybe, if I hadn’t been an EMT, I’d never read the obituary section of the newspaper. I’d pull over for the flashing lights of an ambulance, briefly wonder what happened, and then continue back on my way without giving it another thought. Instead of hearing the screams and cries of those involved echo inside my head when watching the evening news; the stories would only cause sighs of dismay and temporary grief, before drifting back to the dusty corners of my mind, soon to be forgotten.

But, maybe not. I will never know. Sometimes, I look into the pictures of my younger self and think, “God, the things you’re going to see. The things you’re going to hear. The things you’re going to do. If I told you, would you believe me?”

Three years ago, I made the decision to go into the emergency medical services. Unknowingly, I chose a life that would never be “normal” again. Sure, I could quit and change to a regular 9-to-5 job; but the experiences I’ve had will never leave me. Funny thing is, I don’t think I’d ever want them to.

I chose an experience, a brotherhood, a life like nothing else. It wasn’t expected or planned. But despite its occasional ugliness, I fell in love with this field. There’s no turning back now. I will never know what it’s like to have the “traditional college experience.” I’ll never know what it’s like to fumble my way into adulthood hand-in-hand with peers of my age. I will never know what it’s like to have a college sweetheart. I will never read the paper or watch the news the same way again. But, I will live my life knowing I made some small difference in my corner of the world. I will know, as tough as it can be, I did what I absolutely loved.  I will know a great many things about life, mankind, and the human spirit that most people will never understand.

It’s true…some days, I look back at my younger self and say, “What on earth did I get you into?” But I know, I wouldn’t trade this for anything.

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