Poetic Juxtaposition in a Small Town

Working in a small town provides a glimpse at some truly beautiful, near-poetic things. There are the smiles and friendly waves of townspeople as you walk around downtown in your uniform. There’s the warm food, donated by generous local restaurants that volunteered to open in the middle of cold, brutal nights; provided to the victims and responders of a local tragedy. There are the “Thank you” cards that are proudly and thoughtfully tacked to the station cork boards. There’s that pristine hour after clearing an end-of-shift call, where new morning sun filters through the mist, and reflects softly off still ponds. There’s the privilege of being allowed inside of those small, sleepy townhouses and cabins; the same ones that seep curly plumes of sweet woodsmoke into crisp morning air. There’s the sanctity of caring for the people we see every day; those we grew up with and know well, and those who are familiar strangers.

That familiarity–that close-knit bond unique to those who work and live in a small town–can provide for the most inspiring, speechless joy; and unfortunately brilliant sorrow. Sometimes, you are called into those small, sleepy townhouses and cabins, and you witness and participate in the recovery of not just an illness, but a life that weaves frequently into yours within this little town. Other times, you are called around the stoves’ hearths that seep those curly plumes of sweet woodsmoke, and you are asked, demanded, begged to fix something that cannot be fixed; cure something that cannot be cured. Then, that particular thread of life is missing from the usual, comfortable tapestry of every day.

It’s hard to tell a family, “I’m sorry, but she’s passed away.” It’s hard to stop pushing on the chest of someone you’d known, either close or from afar. It’s hard when a family member cries into your uniform as you try to console them with a hug. It’s hard when they watch you pick up the trash, pack up the equipment; and leave them with their sorrow, the whirlwind of funeral directors and arrangements, and the shell of their loved one. What’s harder is when you can’t put the call to the back of your mind, filed away somewhere along with the other codes and unfortunate calls you’d been a part of–when you are forced to face the aftermath of what you couldn’t help. When you are required to attend this person’s funeral.

I was uncomfortable as we waited for the services to start. I kept my head down, chin tucked against the lump in my throat. Part of me hoped I wouldn’t be recognized by the survived who were there on that day my partner and I were called to try. I prayed I wouldn’t be asked once again by a distraught family member, “Why didn’t you save her?” Because it was too late. Because the odds were astronomical. Because it was her time. Because I couldn’t. I would never say those out loud. They wouldn’t alleviate the pain. What’s more, it doesn’t answer question they really want answered: Why did she have to go now?

I focused so intently on trying to find comfort in this awkward, sad situation; trying to be both present and invisible. I was focused so intently, I almost didn’t recognize the man who had taken the seat beside me. He turned and chatted with a friend and coworker of mine. Then, my shoulder was tapped.

“Do you remember that code a while back?” My friend started. I squinted my eyes and thought as he described the house, the room, the circumstances. It all flooded back to me, back from the corner of my mind where the code that resulted in this funeral should be. I nodded. “This is him. This was your patient.”

I looked into those bright, sea-glass green eyes. The last time I looked into them, I was breathing for him. He was cool, gray, limp. Now, his handshake was strong and warm. There was such a life about him. Every blink, every smile, every word out of his mouth seemed so completely miraculous and wonderful. I wanted to talk to him all day, if for no other reason that to truly be in awe of life and every little thing we take for granted.

We sat next to each other during the ceremony. I sat beside a man whose life I helped save, whose thread I helped preserve; while mourning the loss of a life I couldn’t save, the newest uneasy void in our local community’s tapestry. The juxtaposition was beautifully, inspiringly, sadly, uniquely poetic; leaving me with a deeper, greater appreciation for my life and work in this small town.

Let Them Say Goodbye

“Huh, interesting,” I thought. I was being sent up to the ER to assist with a transfer to another, larger hospital. “Interesting, but not particularly rare or unusual.”

I’d seen this diagnosis numerous times. Hell, I’d seen this presentation for this diagnosis a couple times too. When asked if my assistance would be needed, the doctor sucked on the inside of his cheek thoughtfully, and finally said, “The patient will probably be alright. But, eh, it wouldn’t hurt to stack the deck.” And that’s how I became a second set of hands in the back of the truck. If you were superstitious, you might say I was sent with the intention of being more of a good luck charm than a second practitioner. If you weren’t, you might just say I was a poorly allocated resource.

Four-leaf clover or unnecessary weight in the back of the truck, I was happy to be going along on a transfer with a pretty sick patient. Even better, a pretty sick patient with an anticipated positive outcome. Sounded like I was going to go home that night content with the somewhat false knowledge that I helped a little bit today.

Our patient was a sweetheart. Polite, witty, intelligent, friendly, but definitely a bit nervous and frazzled. She had a dog that needed walking, a yoga class to get to, an upcoming vacation to pack for. This trip to the hospital was not planned in her tidy schedule. Her husband stood at the door, fidgeting with his jacket, occasionally taking a few paces forward and a few paces back.

We got her settled on our stretcher, and hooked her up to all of our equipment. Explanations were sprinkled with light jokes, which seemed to calm her somewhat. In short order, we were ready to load her into the ambulance and get on our merry way. I started for the door when I felt my partner pull back ever so lightly on the stretcher.

“Would you like to give her a kiss goodbye?” The paramedic offered gently and brightly. The husband sheepishly grinned, and shuffled over to his wife. He kissed her on the lips, then gently on the forehead. He smoothed back the stray, wavy locks that had sprung free from her braid.

“I’ll be over soon. I’m just going to go home, pack a few things, and call the boys. But I’ll be right there,” He promised.

“Take your time. Don’t worry. I won’t be going anywhere,” She dismissed with a smile and a squeeze of his hand.

It was a cute and tender exchange–one that softens my heart for a little whenever I see it. We whisked her away into the back of the ambulance and took off without much of another thought about it. After a few quiet minutes, her concern became evident.

“I never thought this could happen to me. I do everything right,” She said quietly, tears brimming in her eyes. The paramedic set down his paperwork, and fished around for the small box of cheap tissues. Our patient squeezed my hand lightly. I squeezed back.

I picked a line from my mental toolbox. I’d used it plenty of times before, and I meant it every single time.

“Hey. Look at me,” I started gently. When she lifted her eyes to meet mine, I offered a timid, crooked smile. I tried to let my eyes reflect the compassion and concern I had for this wonderful woman. “Do I look scared?” I ticked my head in the direction of the paramedic. “Does he look scared?”

“No.”

“Then it’s okay. We’re doing everything we can for you, and there is nothing about what’s going on right now that scares us, or is making us panic. You’re in great hands. We’re here to help.”

 

I will never use that line again.

 

She thought it over for a second, as a playful smile eased her worried brow. “So, when you guys start looking scared–then I should be scared?” She teased.

“Yes,” I laughed, “Then you can be scared.”

Her nervousness diminished some as she told us about her life. About how her childhood best friend grew up to be a nurse. About how she met her husband at the local lake one summer. About how she turned down his friend’s request for a date because she really wanted to date her future husband instead. About how she went on to be a teacher. About how she loves to make apple turnovers while singing, which she thought bothered her husband (although he never said anything). About how she loves going to yoga in the morning, and taking walks in the evenings. About her small house by the lake. About how the smell of daisies, pine, and pond water always seems to set things in perspective.

I could’ve listened to her forever. That might be my favorite thing about EMS–being granted the privilege to look through these snapshots of life with another person. But, soon enough, we arrived at our destination. We wove our stretcher through throngs of nurses, doctors, and families, we found our room assignment.

I turned to prepare our patient for the sheet transfer to the hospital bed. In a sickening, heart-dropping instant, everything had changed. That rare, potential complication that is listed when consent forms are signed…it was actually happening. It was no longer just words on paper. It was no longer something the doctors say to cover their ass. It was right there, and it was real. And there was nothing we could do about it.

The changes were subtle, but rapid. The next few minutes were a blur of gloved hands, quick assessments, urgent murmurs, and STAT tests. A frustrated doctor cursed in the hallway. Nurses were preparing to take our patient to other departments, other rooms; somehow heading simultaneously towards and away from hope. We all knew what the results were going to say, but we needed to see the physical, undeniable damage to permanently extinguish the ever-diminishing hope that maybe this won’t be so bad.

As we passed the stretcher to the staff, our patient grabbed my hand, nearly pulling me over from the momentum of the rolling gurney. Her glassy eyes searched my face. My eyes probably betrayed my fearful, worried interior that I tried to mask with a stoic, serious face.

Barely lucid, she mumbled, “I’m scared now.”

I squeezed her hand and swallowed hard. They took her away to care for her as best they could. Approximately ten minutes later, she was unconscious. She would never wake up again.

My crew and I cleaned the stretcher and ambulance, occasionally muttering something to reflect our disbelief. We stood in the ambulance bay, taking in the skyline of this foreign, distant place. On some street between here and home, is a husband driving over to check on his lovely wife of so many years. A bag is packed and sitting in the backseat. Maybe an apple turnover is sealed up in some Tupperware in there. Maybe a shirt from off the clothesline, saturated with the comforting scent of daisies, pine, and pond water. And as he sings softly along with the radio, he has no idea that he just kissed his wife goodbye for the last time.

We sighed. “I can’t believe…” We’d start. “It happened so fast…” We’d try. But in the end, we were left with nothing but the road noise and a quiet, sad shock.

“We can’t prevent everything. We can’t treat everything. Some things you just don’t see coming,” The paramedic said numbly. “But you can always let them say goodbye. You can always give them that minute. You just never know. It might be the last time.”

Flight

Working for an aeromedical transport team wasn’t always a goal of mine. It wasn’t something I’ve always wanted since I was little (although there is a picture of my 3-year-old self wearing a medic’s helmet and grinning broadly in a helicopter in a photo album somewhere). It wasn’t part of the reason I got into EMS. But my fascination and desire to earn my wings grew steadily over my short medical career.

The first time I ever saw a flight crew, they were coming to pick up our patient in the hospital. My preceptor tried not to smile when he saw the awestruck look on my face. They  were  calm, and collected. They walked with a swagger into our ER. They asked these questions with big, fancy words. And, okay, I’ll admit it, they looked so cool in those swanky flight suits. As they loaded up and prepared to head back to the helicopter, a nurse asked one of our paramedics if he could help carry some equipment back to the bird. He agreed, before handing a bag to me. He knew how badly I wanted to watch a helicopter take off, and that I’d never seen one before. I carried the bag with pride out to the helipad, and watched with total awe as they took off. When I got back to the ambulance, my preceptor chuckled at my obvious excitement. I told him I wanted to be just like them. Always supportive, he told me that one day I could be.

To this day, watching helicopters take off and land through my classroom’s window is a great tangible reminder as to why my butt is growing numb in those awful plastic seats. I can do this. I will do whatever it takes, and I will get there. It won’t matter how many all-nighters I pull, how many tears I shed, or how frustrated I get. I will get there, some day.

Just imagine my elation when my old preceptor handed me a ride-along application packet for a aeromedical critical care transport service. When I was accepted, I marked the date down on my calendar. It gave me something to look forward to, amongst the boring clinicals, personal problems, and seemingly impossible countdown until graduation. Soon, I would finally get to spend a few hours living the life I wanted so badly.

That day has come and past. The experience was a mixed bag.

I loved the crew I was with. Everyone was so friendly. There was such a camaraderie, and it was everything I could have hoped for. It just made me want to be a flight nurse or medic that much more. I was practically shaking with excitement went the helicopter was pulled out of the hangar. Everything inside me lit up with happiness as we lifted off.

The flight made me feel a little funny. I wasn’t exactly nauseous or dizzy. I just felt that familiar general strangeness I get whenever I fly in airplanes. It’s not uneasiness or sickness. Just this very subtle difference. When we landed, we piled into the back of an ambulance. It wasn’t anything like the ambulances back home, but it was oddly comforting to me nonetheless. I was standing in the ER, maybe a full three minutes after we’d landed, when it hit. I was overwhelmingly nauseous and dizzy. I leaned up against the wall, and tried to pay attention to what was going on. (I wasn’t allowed to engage in patient care–even to help lift–anyway, so I wasn’t missed terribly.) Now I started shaking with nerves. What was I going to do? Here I am, feeling absolutely awful, and I still have two more flights ahead of me? There’s no way…

Oddly, when we got back into the helicopter, I felt fine. The patient was hardly labor-intensive, to put it lightly. But the nausea and dizziness just evaporated. The flight was flawless. Again, maybe three minutes after we’d landed, I felt that disorientation, dizziness, and nausea creep back into my body. Nobody else seemed to notice, but then again, I wasn’t needed or asked to do anything. I continued to feel crummy for the flight back to the hangar. Although I started to feel better back at the hangar, my stomach didn’t fully recover for an hour or so afterwards.

There were so many things I loved about my opportunity to fly. But, it’s all dampened by this huge overwhelming fear: what if I can’t do this? What if I’m extremely prone to being airsick? This isn’t something that can be fixed with better grades, more studying, more experience, or more certifications. This is something I can’t control. To be stripped of this dream terrifies me. It has completely flipped everything around. It’s made me question and worry about so much. I hate to have this goal, this dream, this desire that has fueled so much, be completely snuffed out. All because of one glitch in my stupid body.

I’ve talked it over with a few people who have flown. Most have told me not to worry about it. I had literally scarfed down an entire Tupperware container of ravioli in three minutes before the mission because I could practically feel my blood sugar dropping. (I hadn’t eaten all day because I was so excited…don’t do that.) I had slept three hours the night before, worked the entire day before, and slept another three hours the night before that. It’s safe to say I was pretty sleep starved and running off of pure adrenaline, excitement, and caffeine. I’d also never flown in a helicopter like that.

I’ve been told that practically everyone feels airsick at some point in their flight career. That I’m willing to accept and take as it comes. My fear is that airsickness is my baseline, but I won’t really have any way of knowing right now. Is it possible that my sickness (which oddly only happened after I landed) was mostly due to the fatigue, overly full belly, and inexperience? If it turns out to be a more regular thing, is this something you can “train” yourself out of? Would frequently spending time in a small plane help accustom me to being in the air? Could medications be effective?

I’m so desperate for any answers that will tell me that my dream doesn’t have to disappear. I just want a glimmer of hope or good news that says I don’t have to give up and throw everything away. That is perhaps the most devastating part.

November

Physically, the drive to Major Medical Center is a little easier when driving a car instead of an ambulance. There’s not nearly as much surface area for the wind to toss the vehicle around when I’m cruising down mountain roads in my car. The drive goes by a little faster when listening to loud music in the confines of my personal vehicle. Emotionally, however, this drive is a completely different story.

In the ambulance, I have protection. Occasionally, old memories start to stir in the back of my mind. But they’re easily buried beneath the more intense focus I have when driving this large vehicle. I can hide in the professionalism I put on with my uniform. I can drown it out when chatting with my partner. But in the car? I have none of those luxuries. It’s just me, the radio, and this long drive that does nothing but dig up old memories.

A year ago, almost to the day, I was making this same journey in this same small vehicle. The same jagged lines of mountains and valleys lay just beyond the metal guard rail. The same bare trees stood in the piles of dead, reddened leaves. The same enormous building sprawled out before me, patient windows glittering in the afternoon sun. The same road wound past the ambulance entrance, where I’d parked my truck many times before, and continued down to visitor parking. And an eerily similar sense of dread settled into my stomach when I put the car in park.

A year ago, I made that drive knowing that, once at my destination, I would play a part in making that ultimate decision for my grandmother: comfort measures only, or aggressive medical and physical therapies. I felt fleeting emotions in a numb, hollow space in my chest: fear, sorrow, grief, strength, anger. It was an awful experience I wouldn’t forget. I just didn’t realize that a year later, I’d be making this same journey.

This time, I’m driving up to go see my father. It was supposed to be a relatively simple surgery for a relatively simple problem. Instead of this quick, easy procedure and recovery, we were met with complications and phone calls, sleepless nights and unknowns, running nurses and worried doctors. A week-and-a-half later, time and progress feels as though it’s standing still.

Something about November, Major Medical Center, and my family. I hope with all my heart that we don’t have to make the same decision this year.

Please keep him in your thoughts. Thank you.

Rant: Snoozing Partners

I can’t stand it when my partner* falls asleep on the long rides back home.

There, I’ve said it. I feel kind of guilty about it, but I’m writing it nonetheless.

It’s not uncommon for us to go on runs where the drive alone–one way–is 75 minutes. The drive can be incredibly boring. Combine that with a long shift, and a very late hour, it’s easy to see how one can get tired.

Now, I know we’ve all been there. You finally reach that point where the only things caffeine does is make your hands tremble, and your stomach rumble like an angry grizzly bear using a chainsaw in an earthquake. You would give absolutely anything to get comfy and curl up in bed, or any other remotely horizontal surface. Your eyes are bloodshot. Your eyeliner is running into the bags  under your eyes, or your 5 o’clock shadow is coming in nicely ahead of schedule at 3 a.m. (Or, maybe both. Who am I to judge?) In general, you just feel awful. The notion of sweet, sweet sleep is never far from your mind. When you start making up the cot and communicating with your partner in a series of grunts, gestures, and looks, you know that you’re both getting to that point, and can’t wait to get back to the station for the relief crew.

I get in to drive, and my partner climbs in the passenger seat. Not 10 minutes down the road, I hear him snort and snuffle. A quick glance over confirms that he did, indeed, fall asleep. I spend the rest of my drive silent and frustrated that he gets to sleep and I don’t. I can’t turn the radio on to distract myself from fatigue, because he’s asleep. Obviously, this also means I have no one to talk to.

It’s petty and stupid, I know. But being super exhausted when this all goes on doesn’t exactly bestow me with the patience of a saint. And we all have those little things that irk us. Right?

Ranting over.

*Actually, several partners, not just one.

Saving My Life

I need to hear that shrill tone. The one that pulls me from my day and thrusts me into that of another’s. The one that orders me into my little car, and sends me to the station. The one that sits me on the bench of the ambulance, soaking in the smell of plastics and chemical cleaners. The one that captivates my attention for an hour or two.

I need the illusion that I belong. That what I do matters. To justify my reason for being. I need the excuse to keep me here another day. I need the time to think about something other than whether I should stay or go. Other than if my mistakes of yesterday outweigh my possibilities of tomorrow.

I need to feel like I’m part of something bigger than just me. Bigger than the emotional storm clouding my thoughts, raging in my head and my heart. I need to be given a few hours where I can stop worrying about yesterday and tomorrow. Where the only thing that matters is right here in this moment. The only thing that matters is the person whose hand I’m holding; the life that I’m caring for.

I need that tone to go off. Just one more time. I just need one more day to figure this out. Just get me through today.

EMS is saving my life. Hopefully, one day, I’ll be able to say it’s saved my life.

Healing Is Not A Linear Process

I’ve learned plenty of things as an EMT. I’ve learned what the top and bottom numbers of a blood pressure mean. I’ve learned how to splint a fractured bone. I’ve learned the proper way to talk on the radio. I’ve learned how to start an intravenous line. I’ve learned that real life is nothing like the textbook. In the textbook, you see calm, cooperative patients, neatly packaged in controlled, well-lit environments. Ask anyone who’s ever run an EMS call, and they’ll tell you the real world is nothing like that. But, there’s a quieter, more subtle difference between the textbook and reality; one that might not be realized right away. Once you experience it, however, you’ll never forget it.

You see, there are no pictures in the textbooks of EMT’s lost in thought, laying wide awake at night. There are no images of paramedics waking up with nightmares. There are no illustrations of providers crying, or torturing themselves with “Why?” and “What if?” These things are mentioned, though. But in real life, you only hear about it quiet whispers, if at all.

I’m willing to bet that most EMT’s and paramedics who truly love their work, and have some time under their belt, have had at least one call that stays with them. It could be a nasty trauma. It could be a medical call that got out of your control. It could be subtle details in an otherwise routine call that trigger something else. We don’t talk about it too much, though. Maybe we’re afraid, or we think we’re alone. Maybe we’re embarrassed. Maybe talking about it just isn’t helpful for some.

Everyone deals with their demons differently. Go do whatever you need to do to help yourself. Talk about it. Meditate. Write. Lift some weights. Paint. Run until you can’t feel your legs anymore. Shoot some targets. Spend time with loved ones. Play with your dog. Do whatever it is you need to so you can help yourself.

But, what if you’ve done that? What if you’ve done everything you can think of?

This is the other thing I’ve learned in EMS: healing is not a linear process. There are good days, and there are bad. You reach your peaks, and you think everything is fine…and the next day, you wake up to find yourself in a trough again. It doesn’t mean you are broken. All of your work is not undone when you find yourself hurting again. The ups and downs of your progress aren’t as important as the direction: forward. You may be down today, but you are further forward than you were yesterday. A straight line may be the quickest way to get from “unwell” to “well.” But there’s a reason why it’s called the “healing process” and not the “healing race.” There will be days where you will soar, and there will be days that you will falter.

Trust me when I say that you will have good days. You will have calls that make you smile, fill you with pride, and lift you up. These troubles that bother you so much now, will one day serve to strengthen and teach you; not haunt you. We all have those calls that we will never forget, but I promise you, they will not always cause this kind of pain that worries you right now.

 

The Breakdown (And The People Who Helped)

My mind was swirling with a nauseating soup of questions and uncertainties. I felt this sickening pull in my stomach. Yet, it was all muted. I was manipulating red hot emotions through thick welder’s gloves. I couldn’t name it, I couldn’t identify it, but I knew it didn’t sit well with me. I quietly engaged in superficial and meaningless conversation with my partner as we backed into the ambulance bay. I was just politely filling in the silence, while simultaneously trying to figure out what was happening to me internally.

Numb, I climbed out of the ambulance, paperwork in hand. I returned the other crews’ greetings, and headed into the kitchen to grab a glass of water. An officer nonchalantly followed me into the kitchen, and quietly asked, “Are you okay?”

I looked at him, confused. “I don’t really know. I think so,” I mumbled. He patiently waited, watching my face as my eyes nervously shifted around the room. How could I not even know what was going on inside of my own head? I sighed, “I know I’m going to need one of the quieter rooms to write this report. There are phone calls that need to be made about this one.”

His eyes widened, almost imperceptibly, before nodding once. He set me up with a computer in a room away from the commotion of the common area. “If you need anything…let me know. I don’t care what it is…someone to talk to–”

“No,” I fiercely interrupted. “No, I’m fine. I don’t know what my problem is. I’m probably just tired or something.”

“I’ve seen you tired. That’s not it,” He said, looking me dead in the eyes. I broke his gaze, fidgeting with my paperwork. He knew me too well. His tone softened, “If you need anything. Someone to talk to…food…music…I don’t care what. Whatever you need, let me know, and we’ll get it squared away.”

He left me to take care of what I needed to. I didn’t realize it at the time, but he was already working on helping me–even before I properly understood myself. Those strange, detached feelings continued to stir in my head as I went through the familiar monotony of creating the report. And out of nowhere, I just started to cry.

What is wrong with you? I asked myself, disgusted. There was nothing on that call that should elicit that response. I’d run plenty of calls just like that one. This wasn’t some horrendous, gory trauma. This wasn’t a call where the patient was rapidly deteriorating before my eyes. This wasn’t about playing catch-up, or not being able to do a single thing right. Why this time? Why this patient? Why now? Why are you reacting like this? How can you see people horribly mangled and not bat an eye, and then lose it over something like this??? What is the matter with you?

My narrative was getting incredibly long and unruly. While blinking away tears, I wrote about every, single, last, detail I could possibly remember. About halfway through, I just propped my elbows on the table, and rested my head in my hands. I was giving up on holding it together, and figuring out why I couldn’t.

My phone buzzed against the table. Taking a deep, steadying breath, I tried to compose myself and answer it as evenly as possible.

“You sound like hell. What happened to you?” The chief officer on the other end of the line asked. Apparently it’s pretty hard to shake the sound of an unexpected melt down from your voice. Particularly at 1:30 in the morning. I stammered, dismissed, and evaded. He was having none of it. Finally, I got him to hang up. I figured I’d won.

By 2 a.m., there were three of the highest ranking officers at my department were sitting in that room with me–in their pajamas, no less. I offered smiles, thanked them, and tried to dismiss them. But they stayed with me for more than an hour. They told me stories of their distressing calls from back in the day, and the seemingly inexplicable breakdowns.

“That call, for whatever reason, touched you. And it’s okay to be sad. It’s okay to be angry. It’s okay to be confused. It’s the strangest, smallest details of a call sometimes that just hits you. It doesn’t have to be these obviously traumatic calls,” One told me.

I was given heartfelt compliments. I was given reassurance that this call didn’t make me weak or stupid. It didn’t mean the end of my career if I didn’t want it to be. They gave me their personal cell phone numbers, and was given instructions to call them whenever I needed to. They gave me hugs. But most importantly, they gave me their time–even in the dead of night. They gave me confidence, compassion, and understanding.

I don’t know many high-ranking managers that would go to the lengths that these individuals did. They went above and beyond. It’s something I will never forget, and will always be grateful of. Managers or officers, especially those that go out of their way to take care of their own…I can’t thank you enough.

For My Dear Friend

What might possibly be my strongest skill set as an EMT is my ability to comfort people. I’m not a paramedic, and I don’t have much at hand to make the physical pain go away. My strength is handling emotional pain. I’m good at sympathy/empathy, and I tend to have a good idea of what to say when someone really needs to hear it. Maybe, in a weird, twisted way that only another similarly afflicted individual can understand, I was somewhat blessed to suffer from (and, I’m proud to say, mostly overcome) depression. Maybe that’s what gave me the skill set I so value. Who knows.

But sometimes, I’m at a complete loss. I don’t know what to say, what to do, or how to help. And, my friend, I’m sorry that that’s what is happening now.

You’ve listened to me whine and fight my way over the mountains I had made out of molehills, and never once did you berate me for it. You have a way of combining compassion with straight-forward, practical advice. Hear me when I say that I’m very lucky to have you for a friend…hell, I remember the first time you wrote to me, my jaw dropped in utter disbelief that you would want to have anything to do with me. You’ve helped me through so much. And I’m horribly disappointed in myself that right now, I don’t know how to help you.

You are one strong person, and I hope you know that. I can’t imagine ever working through all the things that you are handling with an enduring, silent grace. I am both proud and in awe of you. You are carrying on, much in the same way you gently tell me to, despite all of these reasons that would break lesser men.

I won’t doubt you when you say you are fine. It’s not my place. But I want you to know that if you ever are not…if you ever find yourself in darkness and can’t find the light, if your back is ever overburdened, if your head and heart are too heavy to take another step forward, or if your tongue is bloody from constantly biting it and swallowing your words before they can escape your lips…

I want you to know that I will grab a flashlight for you (with extra batteries). I will try to help you carry the load on your back. I will give you a shoulder to rest or cry on. I will give you an ear to listen to what you are tired of holding back. I will be your friend, and I will do my best to repay all the kindnesses you’ve bestowed upon me.

Keep eating that elephant. And should you get a stomachache, I’ll sit down and share a meal with you.

Or at least give you Zofran.

Are You Taught To Hate Your Field?

Why on earth is the healthcare provider education system so hell bent on burning people out before they’ve even got their license in hand?

At least that’s the way it seems. Maybe it’s just a regional thing. Maybe all the schools in my area are teaching using similar techniques, and all the teachers subscribe to a similar mindset. Or maybe I’ve officially lost my mind (I am certainly not ruling that out).

This post is going to mostly be about nursing school, because that’s what I’ve experienced. But, any new-grad paramedic I know has talked about similar problems.

For any of you that actually read my rambling, babbling, nonsensical drawl, you know that I am unhappy in nursing school. Yes, I do feel absolutely miserable. Every week, I find myself up in the wee hours of the morning on the verge of a mental meltdown. Every drive to school is filled with anxiety, and every drive home is filled with discouragement. It feels almost like a trap some days. The further into the program I get, the worse I feel, but the more obligated I feel to finish it. At my worst, I find myself panicky, physically sick, unable to sleep, and waking up with horribly graphic and disturbing nightmares. Sometimes I start wondering why I ever decided to go into nursing. In my stress, I start to look for other careers I could do. Maybe I’ll find my calling in something else. In the past, I’ve considered going to paramedic school. Currently, I have some wild aspiration to go into law enforcement…which I’m sure would be greatly discouraged by anyone who actually knows me. I have to stop and wonder if these aspirations are real, or if I’m just looking into them because it’s something other than what I’m going through right now.

I’m in an associate’s degree program, so it’s only 2 years long. Most paramedic programs are about that long as well. It’s a short amount of time in which to learn a lot of important things. It’s not like earning a typical degree…after we get out of school, our decisions could greatly impact the lives of others. The stakes are very high, and it’s incredibly important to learn as much as we can in the short time that we have. Maybe these programs are just too short to be reasonable. I find that students in these shorter healthcare degrees/certification programs are just so stressed out and inundated with schoolwork that they find themselves discouraged or disliking the career they are about to enter. It’s heartbreaking to work so hard towards something, and then to be almost directed to hate it.

Maybe I just don’t love my potential career enough. Maybe I’m not dedicated enough. And like I mentioned before, maybe it’s purely a regional thing. Regardless, something should change here. Maybe it’s just me. Or maybe it’s the healthcare system. Or perhaps something in between.

Are any of you having problems similar to this? Or did I really just plain old lose my mind.