Newbie A Newbie: What To Bring For Your First Shift

You took the class. Studied hard. Stressed for the exams. Took your national/state exams. Convinced yourself you failed all of them and wept softly into a pint (of Ben & Jerry’s?). Found out you passed. And then landed a job as an EMT. Congratulations!!!

It’s been a pretty stressful past few months. I wish I could tell you the stress was over. Honestly, it’s not. It just takes on a different form–albeit, a more enjoyable form (at least I thought so). Soon, you’ll officially be taking your first step as an official EMT: your first day on the job. I don’t know about you, but I had no idea what to expect. But, I’ve come up with a list of things that are pretty important to have with you on your first day. Without further ado…

 

A WATCH – Don’t try and tell me that you can ballpark a pulse by simply feeling it. I’m calling you out on that right now. That may be true of some experienced EMS personnel, but it’s not true of you (yet). Also, you’re going to be recording times on the procedures you perform, the medications you give, and the vitals you take. Sure, some ambulances have clocks in them. I can honestly say I’ve never been in an ambulance where they worked correctly for more than a shift. Just trust me here, and go buy a watch.

You can get whatever you want, but I have some personal preferences for watches. Firstly, I use an analog watch. Watching the seconds count off on a digital watch is just way too confusing for me. It’s like somebody saying, “23, 39, 0, 62, 11” when I’m trying to count. With an analog watch, I can count in my head and simply observe the time pass in segments. Also, I like a strap that I can disinfect and clean easily; namely rubber or plastic. Also, I prefer the band to be solid, as opposed to having links. You’d be surprised about the gross stuff that can collect in those nooks and crannies. I prefer my watch to be waterproof so I’m not constantly taking it off whenever I wash my hands. I also like one with a second hand that “ticks” instead of “sweeps”; I can’t accurately tell 15 seconds with a second hand that’s constantly moving (sweeps), versus one that ticks out every second. Lastly, I want something on my watch to glow–and not just because I’m like birds and small children when it comes to bright and shiny things. I work lots of night shifts, so I want either the numbers or the face of the watch to light up.

All that being said, I don’t buy crazy expensive watches. My favorite watch was $20, had all of features listed above, and I wore it every day until it broke after 2.5 years of wearing it. And, let me tell you, that thing took a beating. Figure out what works for you.

 

PENS – At least two, at a bare minimum. I go through pens like water. I’m constantly losing them, breaking them, or permanently lending them to someone. True story: I once found myself in the back of a rig on a call with no pens. Even my partner didn’t have one. So I wound up writing all my notes down in Sharpie. That was incredibly hard to read later on, and, frankly, pretty embarrassing. Don’t be that guy me. Always keep pens on you. No crazy colors either–a simple black or blue is good. Ballpoint pens are good, seeing how so many services use that carbon copy “Bear down because you’re making 7,238 copies” paperwork.

 

SOME CASH – Odds are, you’re going to get hungry. Or thirsty. Or under-caffeinated. Even if you’re one of those responsible people that packs snacks and a meal, unforeseen things happen. Your relief doesn’t show up on time…or at all. Your truck breaks down. You don’t have enough time to get all the way back to the station to grab your food. Besides, it’s amazing how overwhelmingly tempting it is to grab at least a little something when your partner decides to swing by Dunkins, or 7-Eleven, or Panda-Wok, or whatever. Keep a little cash on you…you never know when it’ll come in handy. Better to have it and not use it, than to not have it and need it.

 

PATIENCE – This one’s pretty simple, although it can be hard. EMS can be a pretty stressful field. Maybe it’s a call. Maybe it’s the weird hours. Maybe you don’t get along so well with your partner/preceptor. And, to add to that stress, you’re brand new! You’re still getting a feel for how things work. You’re getting to know your new coworkers. You’re getting used to being in a moving vehicle all the time. You’re trying to apply your textbook knowledge. You’re finding out that the real world and the classroom don’t always line up (You’ll probably first notice it when trying to take a blood pressure in the back of a truck. That was a shocker.) And, not for nothing, you’re doing it in a pretty high stakes environment. These are real people, with real lives. It doesn’t get much more overwhelming than that.

Remind yourself that you’re brand new. Your partner/preceptor’s actions and decisions are going to look so fluid and effortless. Meanwhile, you’re fumbling around, untangling the nasal cannula and praying that you put it on right. Trust me, your coworkers were once in your boots. It may  have been last year, or twenty years ago; but they were there. They were just as nervous, frustrated, and overwhelmed. All you need is time, experience, and the desire to learn.

The beautiful thing about being so new in your career is that you can pretty readily remember why you wanted to do this job. Remind yourself of that when you get down on yourself. Even the most seasoned paramedic with the entire alphabet after his name will have off days. You’re human, and you will make mistakes. What’s more, you’re a human who is trying something new. Expecting perfection is unrealistic. Cut yourself some slack, and commit yourself to learning.

 

SWALLOW YOUR PRIDE – Actually, this is the opposite of something to take with you. It’s something to leave at the door: your (excessive) pride. Like I already mentioned, you are going to make some mistakes. When your adrenaline takes over, and you start ventilating someone with a BVM at 60 breaths per minute, your preceptor is probably going to try to do something to correct you. He might not be super kind or subtle about it (If that happens, sorry. Maybe he’s having a bad day.) Don’t snap back. Don’t snarl, “I know what I’m doing!” When someone tries to teach you something, don’t wave them off–even if it’s something you already know. They’re trying to help you. They don’t know you, so they don’t know where to start. Most of all, ask questions. Don’t worry about sounding dumb.

While we’re on the subject, if you don’t know how to do something–say something. If I hand you a glucometer and say, “Can you grab a sugar for me?”, and you don’t know how to do it, tell me. That’s an easy fix. If you roll your eyes and say, “Uh, yeah,” and then spend 5 minutes unsuccessfully screwing around with the device just to prove you’re “not an idiot”…guess what? You’ve proven to me…well, I was going to say “that you are an idiot,” but that’s a little harsh. You’ve proven to me that you possess some traits that don’t come off very well when you’re brand new: lying, pride, and thinking you know it all.

Asking questions doesn’t make you stupid. It makes you seem receptive to learning. A desire to learn more about the field builds the foundation for other providers to trust you. It means that you care enough about what you’re doing to admit where your deficits are, and that you want to fix them. You care enough to want to be better. And that’s huge.

 

Alright, I’ve prattled on for long enough. Stay tuned for Newbie A Newbie: What To Bring For Your First Shift – Part II!